Difference between revisions of "Children’s use of Social Network"

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<ref>Risks and safety on the internet: the perspective of European children: full findings and policy implications from the EU Kids Online survey of 9-16 year olds and their parents in 25 countries http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/33731/</ref>
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:''Risks and safety on the internet: the perspective of European children: full findings and policy implications from the EU Kids Online survey of 9-16 year olds and their parents in 25 countries http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/33731/''
 
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Latest revision as of 10:18, 14 May 2013


Children who have a profile on a SNS, by country
  • Social networking is most popular, it appears, in the Netherlands (80%), Lithuania (76%) and Denmark (75%), and least practised in Romania (46%) and Turkey (49%) and Germany (51%)
  • Even in these countries, half of the population aged 9-16 years old claims to have their own social networking profile, rising to three quarters in a few countries.
Children who have a profile on a social networking
  • Among all 9-16 year olds across Europe, 59% report having their own social networking profile.
  • Social networking varies hardly at all by gender, with 58% boys and 60% girls having their own profile.
  • It also varies very little by socioeconomic status (SES) also ranging from 57% for children from low SES homes to 61% for those from high SES homes.
  • Most policy attention has focused on the age of users, and here the differences are more dramatic. One quarter (26%) of the 9-10 year olds report having their own profile, compared with half (49%) of 11-12 year olds. For teenagers, percentages are much higher – 73% of 13-14 year olds and 82% of 15-16 year olds.
How often children use the internet, by country
  • Child internet users can be divided into two groups: those who use the internet daily or almost daily (60%) and those who use it once or twice a week (33%). Combined, this is 93% of all children who go online at all; 5% go online once or twice a month, 2% less often.
  • There is little gender difference in frequency of use, although boys are slightly more likely to be daily users (61%, compared with 58% of girls).
  • SES differences are more evident: 67% of children from high SES homes go online daily, compared with 52% from lower SES homes. It seems likely that this reflects differences in quality of access, since children from high SES homes are more likely to have access at home, in their bedroom and via a handheld device.
  • Age differences in frequency of use are the most strongly marked. For 9-10 year olds, one third (33%) go online daily. This percentage rises steadily until for 15-16 year olds, four fifths (80%) go online every day.
How often children use the internet
  • Four in five children from 9-16 in Sweden, Bulgaria, Estonia, Denmark, Norway and the Netherlands use the internet daily. This applies to fewer than half of the children in Turkey, where 33% of children go online daily.
Risks and safety on the internet: the perspective of European children: full findings and policy implications from the EU Kids Online survey of 9-16 year olds and their parents in 25 countries http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/33731/
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